It is violated by such acts as borrowing or purchasing assignments, including but not limited to term papers, essays, and reports; lending to or producing assignments for others (either for or without payment); using concealed notes or crib sheets during examinations; copying the work of others and submitting it as one’s own; and otherwise misappropriating the knowledge of others. Such acts are both dishonest and deceptive: the work submitted to instructors is not the work of the person whose name it bears.

In consequence, the sources from which one derives one’s ideas, statements, terms, and facts, including internet sources, must be fully and specifically acknowledged in the appropriate form. Failure to do so, intentionally or unintentionally, constitutes plagiarism.

In addition to standard guides, students should consult with their Academic Advisor about proper approaches to scholarly documentation, references to be included and attributions to be made.

Intentional Plagiarism

Submitting a paper written by someone else – a paper written by another student, a purchased paper, or a paper downloaded from the internet – can only be construed as intentional plagiarism. So, too, is writing a paper for someone else. The evidence is non debatable.  Plagiarism is not tolerated and may lead to the student failing the course.

Such instances will be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who will require the student (or students) involved to sign the following statement: “Submitting a paper written by someone else as my own work (or writing a paper for someone else) is dishonest. I understand that repeating this offense will result in my suspension or permanent expulsion from AUR.” The instance will also be entered on the student’s record.  A second instance will result in suspension or permanent expulsion from AUR.

The instructor will have the option of failing in the course the student (or students) involved; averaging the zero grade of the plagiarized paper into the student’s final grade; or averaging the zero grade of the plagiarized paper into the student’s final grade and requiring another paper in its place.

The Improper Use of Sources

Using sources improperly or failing to acknowledge them fully and specifically may be construed as intentional or unintentional plagiarism. In such instances the instructor has latitude in determining the seriousness of the offense and the penalty: failing the student in the course; averaging the zero grade of the plagiarized paper into the student’s final grade; averaging the zero grade of the plagiarized paper into the student’s final grade and requiring another paper in its place; or accepting another paper in place of the plagiarized paper and dropping the zero grade.

Such instances will also be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies and entered on the student’s record.   A second instance may result in suspension or permanent expulsion from AUR; a third instance will result in suspension or permanent expulsion from AUR.

Cheating on Examinations

Cheating on examinations in any form whatsoever — using concealed notes or crib sheets, getting help from another student, or giving help to another student —- is a serious offense against academic honesty. The instructor has latitude in determining the grade on the examination and the grade for the course: the grade for the examination may be zero, the grade for the course F.

Such instances will be reported to the Dean. The instance will also be entered on the student’s record. A second instance will result in suspension or permanent expulsion from AUR.

In all these instances students have the option of an appeal to the Academic Fairness Committee.

Grade Appeals

  1. Students dissatisfied with their final grade in a course should meet with the instructor of the course to discuss it. When the grade at issue is a fall semester grade, they should meet as soon as possible and no more than thirty days after the end of the semester; when the grade at issue is a spring semester or summer session grade, they should meet no more than thirty days after the beginning of the fall semester.
  2. Ordinarily instructors will explain how students’ final grades were arrived at. If instructors’ explanations do not satisfy, students will see the Program Director.   If students and the Program Director cannot agree about grades, students may request of the Dean of Graduate Studies an appeal to the Committee on Academic Fairness.
  3. Students are responsible for laying out the grounds for their appeals in writing: either instructors violated institutional requirements or the criteria for grading laid out in their syllabi. Students will supply to the committee graded work from the course in their possession, Program Directors  will supply instructors’ written explanations of how students’ final grades were arrived at and any student work in instructors’ possession, the Registrar will supply instructors’ reports of final grades in the course and students’ final examinations in the course, and the Provost will supply course syllabi and convene the Academic Fairness Committee.
  4. The Academic Fairness Committee, composed of one representative appointed by the Student Government and three Faculty members elected by the Faculty, provides a court of appeal for students who believe they have been unfairly treated. The committee is chaired by the Provost or the Provost’s designee, ex officio and non-voting except in the event of a tie. If it upholds a student’s appeal, the Provost will change the student’s grade to reflect the deliberations of the committee; if the appeal is denied, there is no further appeal.
When instructors are no longer teaching at AUR

The Program Coordinator will consult with instructors by email or telephone and explain to students, in person or by mail, how their final grades were arrived at. If instructors and the Program Director cannot agree about grades, students may request of the Dean an appeal to the Committee on Academic Fairness. Then see above, paragraphs 3. and 4.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students can obtain no more than 3 C grades (including C+ and C) on all courses.  Students with four or more C grades will not qualify for submitting their MA thesis and completing the program. They will be allowed to repeat a course in order to quality. Students must obtain at least B- for their MA thesis to complete the MA Program.