Michelle Hobart’s new book is a major contribution to both Sardinian and Mediterranean history. A Companion to Sardinian History brings together a major group of authors who provide the first significant overview of this island’s Medieval history in English.
 
David Abulafia, author of The Great Sea (Oxford, 2010), will put this major book into its wider Mediterranean context.
   
Michelle Hobart received her laurea in medieval history and archaeology from the University of Siena, Italy, an M.A. in medieval architecture from the Courtauld Institute of Art, London, and her Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. Her studies on the archaeology of medieval Mediterranean focus on Sardinian religious architecture and its material culture. She has also worked on numerous excavations in central Italy, as the co-director of the University of Pennsylvania field school at San Pietro d'Asso (Siena, 2010) and currently director of the SUNY-Buffalo project at Capalbiaccio (Grosseto). Hobart is currently the Scientific co-director of the  SUNY (State University of New York) project IMPERO (Interconnected Mobility of People and Economy along the River Ombrone) in Tuscany, Italy in collaboration with Michigan State University. 
   
David Abulafia, FSA, FRHistS, FBA has been Professor of Mediterranean History at the University of Cambridge since 2000 and a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge since 1974; his current position in the college is that of Papathomas Professorial Fellow. He is the author of many books, including Frederick II of Hohenstaufen (1988) and The Great Sea (2010. For his work on Sicily’s history he was awarded the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity.  In 2013 he was awarded one of three inaugural British Academy Medals for his work on Mediterranean history.

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