THIS LECTURE HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Synopsis

The lecture is devoted to the examination of populism as the construction of a new kind of representative government. A populist democracy promised is the form representative democracy can take in the age of the empire of the audience, in which horizontal networks of communication and transient movements shatter political associations and make politics a terrain of conquest by leaders, whose representative claim relies on the verdict of the audience and the daily communication with the people. Direct representation within electoral democracy: this seemingly oxymoron is the physiognomic of a populist form of democracy. 

About the speaker

Nadia Urbinati (Ph.D., European University Institute, Florence, 1989) is a political theorist who specializes in modern and contemporary political thought and the democratic and anti-democratic traditions. She co-chaired the Columbia University Faculty Seminar on Political and Social Thought and was a co-editor with Andrew Arato of the academic journal Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory. She is a member of the Executive Committee of the Foundation Reset Dialogues on Civilization.

She has been a member of the School of Social Sciences of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, and a Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellowship in the University Center for Human Values, Princeton University. She is permanent visiting professor at the Scuola Superiore de Studi Universitari e Perfezionamento Sant'Anna of Pisa (Italy), and taught at Bocconi University (Milan), SciencesPo (Paris) and the University UNICAMP (Brazil).

She is the winner of the 2008-9 Lenfest/Columbia Distinguished Faculty Award. In 2008 the President of the Italian Republic awarded Professor Urbinati the Commendatore della Repubblica (Commander of the Italian Republic) "for her contribution to the study of democracy and the diffusion of Italian liberal and democratic thought abroad." In 2004 her book Mill on Democracy received the David and Elaine Spitz Prize as the best book in liberal and democratic theory published in 2002.

To learn more about Professor Urbinati and her work, click here.